The javascript used on this site for creative design effects is not supported by your browser. Please note that this will not affect access to the content on this web site.
Skip Navigation

U.S. Government Information on Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation
About Us Terms and Topics FAQs Site Map   
External Web Site Policy
Organdonor.gov Go to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Website organdonor.gov: Give the Gift of Life
 
Home  >  Life Stories

Life Stories: People of Faith, Loving Acts of Donation

Cardinal Stephen Kim Sou-hwan Cardinal Stephen Kim Sou-hwan

Organ and Cornea Donor: Seoul, Korea

Stephen (Stefano) Kim Sou-hwan, born in 1922, was a senior cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church and the former Archbishop of Seoul, South Korea. He became an organ and cornea donor at the age of 86.

Kim was born in Daegu, modern-day South Korea, and attended high school in Seoul. His studies took him from Tokyo to the Catholic University of Korea, and shortly afterward he served as a secretary in the Archdiocese of Daegu.

Kim then traveled to Germany to study sociology at Münster University. He served as the Bishop of Masan, the Archbishop of Seoul, and at the age of 46 was raised to the rank of Cardinal-Priest of San Felice da Cantalice a Centocelle by Pope Paul VI, becoming the youngest member of the College of Cardinals at that time.

In 1998, Cardinal Kim retired as the Archbishop of Seoul. His health began to deteriorate, and he was seldom seen in public, but celebrated the 2008 Christmas Midnight Mass at Myeongdong Cathedral.

In keeping with the Catholic belief that organ donation is an act of charity, fraternal love and self-sacrifice, Cardinal Kim donated his organs and tissues when he died.

A few months later, Cardinal Kim died from respiratory problems at the age of 86. In keeping with the Catholic belief that organ donation is an act of charity, fraternal love and self-sacrifice, Cardinal Kim donated his organs and tissues when he died. His corneas were immediately used in two successful transplants.

Catholicism is one of the many religions that support organ donation. According to Chinese Methodist Reverend Pek Khing Gail Chiew, “Organ and tissue donation are acts of charity, love and self-sacrifice. We encourage all people of faith to become donors as part of their love and ministry to those in need.”

Cardinal Kim’s story is courtesy of OneLegacy, Los Angeles, CA

 


Logo Health Resources and Service Administration (HRSA)

 

 

 

 

 

 
Share This Page  External Web Site Policy  Facebook  YouTube
  • Mail
  • Delicious
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter